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2019 Meskwaki Powwow

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Experience the 105th Annual Meskwaki Powwow on August 8-11, 2019 at the Meskwaki Powwow Grounds on the Meskwaki Indian Settlement in Tama, Iowa. The Annual Meskwaki Powwow originated from the traditional religious and social beliefs of the Meskwaki Tribe. Today, it is not so much a religious event, but more of a social gathering. Specifically, today’s event is derived from the “Green Corn Dance” and other social events of the Tribe in their early years. The “Green Corn Dance” was an annual event that took place during the harvesting of crops. The “Field Days” held from 1902 to 1912, lasted about a week, with dancing, games, and horse racing. It was a social gathering without a harvest.

Meskwaki Powwow

From “Field Days” to Meskawki Powwow
In 1912, the Chief appointed 15 men to plan for the next year. The appointed men decided to change the name from “Field Days” to “Powwow”. The first powwow was held at the present location.

“Today’s” Meskawki Powwow
Today, the Meskwaki Annual Powwow is the only one of its kind in Iowa. It is a four day event used to celebrate the end of summer. As the color and intrigue of it all has drawn the most attention from the outside world, the Meskwaki Annual Powwow features dancing, singing, handcrafts, food, games and fun. Although dance styles and content have evolved over the years, the Meskwaki still consider the event a time of reaffirmation and hope, of kinship and friendship, and of celebration. They are thankful for the opportunity to share a part of who they are as Meskwaki with you. Most importantly, they hope you walk away with open minds and open hearts to be able to respect and learn from different cultures such as theirs.

~ ~ GENERAL ADMISSION ~ ~
Adults: $7.00
Children (6-12): $5.00; $3.00 on Thursday/Children’s Day
Children 5 and under: FREE

PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE
Thursday
1:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. Grand Entry, Intertribal Dancing
Children’s Day: Ages 6-12 $3.00
Friday
1:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. Grand Entry, Intertribal Dancing
Senior Citizen’s Day: 55+ $3.00
Saturday
1:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. Grand Entry, Intertribal Dancing
Veteran’s Day: $3.00 (Must show proof)
Sunday
1:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. Grand Entry, Intertribal Dancing
Special Events to be announced.

Meskwaki Powwow Gallery Preview

View Full Gallery

Meskwaki Powwow Head Staff
Emcee: Mike Keahna, Dawson Davenport
Arena Director: David “Odie” Oldbear Jr
Color Guard: Robert Morgan Post 701
Sound Man: Dennis Keahna Jr

UNIQUE DANCES PERFORMED AT THE MESKWAKI POWWOW
As always, some things change and some things endure, just as you, we like some of the ways and things that have long endured, some of the old-time foods, the dances, the arts and crafts, passed down from our fore bearers that we want to preserve for our children.
Today, we share with you the appreciation of what is truly distinctive about our way of life. We welcome you to our beautiful Meskwaki Indian Settlement.

Dances at the Meskwaki Powwow
Friendship Dance: A universal dance among all tribal nations, it welcomes all visitors and guests to the host tribe. The Friendship Dance expresses goodwill and friendship among all humankind.

Meskwaki Dance: A dance unique to the Meskwaki people. Whenever a gathering of tribal groups took place, each group or tribe performed their own special dance. This dance, performed by the Meskwaki, depicts their characteristics in the times of peace and war.

Read More about Dances at the Meskwaki Powwow
Harvest or Bean Dance: This dance recognizes the importance of the resources of life; food for the villages for the coming year. This dance gives thanks to the Great Spirit for the abundance of food and bountiful crops.

Swan Dance: The women of the tribe lead this dance with graceful movement. It is a tribute to those who have gone before us and their shadowy forms that are unseen. The Swan Dance depicts the graceful movement of birds, especially the most majestic of all water birds.

Buffalo Head Dance: This dance is in honor of the magnificent buffalo and the creator after a successful hunt. The songs and movement of the dancers are dedicated to the enduring spirit of the buffalo.

Pipe Dance: This dance honors warriors for their bravery and heroism in times of conflict.

Shield Dance: In pantomime this dance depicts battle skill in hand to hand combat. This dance was adopted from the Southern Plains Indians in the 1940’s as a recognition of contact in earlier times with the Kiowa, Cheyenne, Arapaho and Comanche.

Shawnee Dance: Whenever the allied tribes came together for council or celebration, they often exchanged elements of cultural value. The Shawnee Dance was given as a token of friendship to the Meskwaki from the Shawnee Tribe in Oklahoma. The five tribes who were closely associated historically in language and traditional ways, were the Shawnee, Mascouten, Kickapoo, Sauk and Fox (Meskwaki Nations).

Rabbit Dance: Originally known as the Owl Dance, a similar Meskwaki Version, this social dance is borrowed from the Lakota. It is a popular two step among all tribes.

Victory Dance: This dance is dedicated to the men and women of the armed forces and it is a dance to honor veterans who have returned home to their loved ones.

Intertribal Dance: A generic dance often performed by anyone in costume during the main performance dances; it is a “break dance”.

Snake Dance: Dancers participate in a “follow-the-leader” style dance that mimics the life cycle of the Snake including when it eats, sheds its skin, and dies. Contrary to its description, it’s a very fun dance for all ages: dancers, singers and observers alike.

Location
Meskwaki Powwow Grounds
X988+86 Tama, IA 52339
(641) 484-4678
Google Map Link

Directions: The Meskwaki Settlement is located along the Iowa river about half way between Des Moines and Cedar Rapids in central Iowa. The easiest way is to come down hwy 30, either direction, and turn south at the Meskwaki Casino exit, turn left(east) and go up the hill until the first stop sign, turn right and go down the hill on the dirt road, past the tribal center and continue down the dirt road until you reach a “T” in the road with the railroad crossing on the right, cross the railroad tracks and continue down to the powwow grounds on the right where the entrance is placed. Once you are on the Meskwaki Settlement there will be colorful signs pointing to the powwow grounds at every entrance to the Settlement.

Meskwaki Powwow - Meskwaki Powwow Grounds

Accommodations:
Camping & RV Space: Available at the Meskwaki Casino.
Hotel: Call Meskwaki Hotel 800-728-4763 or Super 8 at 641-484-5888. Ask for powwow rate.

For More Information: Call (641) 484-4678; Email meskwakipowwow@gmail.com

Mark your calendar today so you won’t miss the next Meskwaki Powwow at the Meskwaki Indian Settlement in Tama, Iowa.

Tags: Meskwaki Powwow, Meskwaki Pow Wow, Iowa Powwow, Iowa Pow Wow

View Other Iowa Powwows

2019 Meskwaki Powwow

Rate This Event

 

Experience the 105th Annual Meskwaki Powwow on August 8-11, 2019 at the Meskwaki Powwow Grounds on the Meskwaki Indian Settlement in Tama, Iowa. The Annual Meskwaki Powwow originated from the traditional religious and social beliefs of the Meskwaki Tribe. Today, it is not so much a religious event, but more of a social gathering. Specifically, today’s event is derived from the “Green Corn Dance” and other social events of the Tribe in their early years. The “Green Corn Dance” was an annual event that took place during the harvesting of crops. The “Field Days” held from 1902 to 1912, lasted about a week, with dancing, games, and horse racing. It was a social gathering without a harvest.

Meskwaki Powwow

From “Field Days” to Meskawki Powwow
In 1912, the Chief appointed 15 men to plan for the next year. The appointed men decided to change the name from “Field Days” to “Powwow”. The first powwow was held at the present location.

“Today’s” Meskawki Powwow
Today, the Meskwaki Annual Powwow is the only one of its kind in Iowa. It is a four day event used to celebrate the end of summer. As the color and intrigue of it all has drawn the most attention from the outside world, the Meskwaki Annual Powwow features dancing, singing, handcrafts, food, games and fun. Although dance styles and content have evolved over the years, the Meskwaki still consider the event a time of reaffirmation and hope, of kinship and friendship, and of celebration. They are thankful for the opportunity to share a part of who they are as Meskwaki with you. Most importantly, they hope you walk away with open minds and open hearts to be able to respect and learn from different cultures such as theirs.

~ ~ GENERAL ADMISSION ~ ~
Adults: $7.00
Children (6-12): $5.00; $3.00 on Thursday/Children’s Day
Children 5 and under: FREE

PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE
Thursday
1:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. Grand Entry, Intertribal Dancing
Children’s Day: Ages 6-12 $3.00
Friday
1:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. Grand Entry, Intertribal Dancing
Senior Citizen’s Day: 55+ $3.00
Saturday
1:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. Grand Entry, Intertribal Dancing
Veteran’s Day: $3.00 (Must show proof)
Sunday
1:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. Grand Entry, Intertribal Dancing
Special Events to be announced.

Meskwaki Powwow Gallery Preview

View Full Gallery

Meskwaki Powwow Head Staff
Emcee: Mike Keahna, Dawson Davenport
Arena Director: David “Odie” Oldbear Jr
Color Guard: Robert Morgan Post 701
Sound Man: Dennis Keahna Jr

UNIQUE DANCES PERFORMED AT THE MESKWAKI POWWOW
As always, some things change and some things endure, just as you, we like some of the ways and things that have long endured, some of the old-time foods, the dances, the arts and crafts, passed down from our fore bearers that we want to preserve for our children.
Today, we share with you the appreciation of what is truly distinctive about our way of life. We welcome you to our beautiful Meskwaki Indian Settlement.

Dances at the Meskwaki Powwow
Friendship Dance: A universal dance among all tribal nations, it welcomes all visitors and guests to the host tribe. The Friendship Dance expresses goodwill and friendship among all humankind.

Meskwaki Dance: A dance unique to the Meskwaki people. Whenever a gathering of tribal groups took place, each group or tribe performed their own special dance. This dance, performed by the Meskwaki, depicts their characteristics in the times of peace and war.

Read More about Dances at the Meskwaki Powwow
Harvest or Bean Dance: This dance recognizes the importance of the resources of life; food for the villages for the coming year. This dance gives thanks to the Great Spirit for the abundance of food and bountiful crops.

Swan Dance: The women of the tribe lead this dance with graceful movement. It is a tribute to those who have gone before us and their shadowy forms that are unseen. The Swan Dance depicts the graceful movement of birds, especially the most majestic of all water birds.

Buffalo Head Dance: This dance is in honor of the magnificent buffalo and the creator after a successful hunt. The songs and movement of the dancers are dedicated to the enduring spirit of the buffalo.

Pipe Dance: This dance honors warriors for their bravery and heroism in times of conflict.

Shield Dance: In pantomime this dance depicts battle skill in hand to hand combat. This dance was adopted from the Southern Plains Indians in the 1940’s as a recognition of contact in earlier times with the Kiowa, Cheyenne, Arapaho and Comanche.

Shawnee Dance: Whenever the allied tribes came together for council or celebration, they often exchanged elements of cultural value. The Shawnee Dance was given as a token of friendship to the Meskwaki from the Shawnee Tribe in Oklahoma. The five tribes who were closely associated historically in language and traditional ways, were the Shawnee, Mascouten, Kickapoo, Sauk and Fox (Meskwaki Nations).

Rabbit Dance: Originally known as the Owl Dance, a similar Meskwaki Version, this social dance is borrowed from the Lakota. It is a popular two step among all tribes.

Victory Dance: This dance is dedicated to the men and women of the armed forces and it is a dance to honor veterans who have returned home to their loved ones.

Intertribal Dance: A generic dance often performed by anyone in costume during the main performance dances; it is a “break dance”.

Snake Dance: Dancers participate in a “follow-the-leader” style dance that mimics the life cycle of the Snake including when it eats, sheds its skin, and dies. Contrary to its description, it’s a very fun dance for all ages: dancers, singers and observers alike.

Location
Meskwaki Powwow Grounds
X988+86 Tama, IA 52339
(641) 484-4678
Google Map Link

Directions: The Meskwaki Settlement is located along the Iowa river about half way between Des Moines and Cedar Rapids in central Iowa. The easiest way is to come down hwy 30, either direction, and turn south at the Meskwaki Casino exit, turn left(east) and go up the hill until the first stop sign, turn right and go down the hill on the dirt road, past the tribal center and continue down the dirt road until you reach a “T” in the road with the railroad crossing on the right, cross the railroad tracks and continue down to the powwow grounds on the right where the entrance is placed. Once you are on the Meskwaki Settlement there will be colorful signs pointing to the powwow grounds at every entrance to the Settlement.

Meskwaki Powwow - Meskwaki Powwow Grounds

Accommodations:
Camping & RV Space: Available at the Meskwaki Casino.
Hotel: Call Meskwaki Hotel 800-728-4763 or Super 8 at 641-484-5888. Ask for powwow rate.

For More Information: Call (641) 484-4678; Email meskwakipowwow@gmail.com

Mark your calendar today so you won’t miss the next Meskwaki Powwow at the Meskwaki Indian Settlement in Tama, Iowa.

Tags: Meskwaki Powwow, Meskwaki Pow Wow, Iowa Powwow, Iowa Pow Wow

View Other Iowa Powwows

Add Your Event

Please do NOT contact Crazy Crow about these events, except for corrections.
We provide these listings as a service, and we have nothing to do with the events. So you must contact the event sponsors for further information and validation of location, dates & times!

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